Human cognition involves the dynamic integration of neural activity and neuromodulatory systems

James M. Shine, Michael Breakspear, Peter T. Bell, Kayla Ehgoetz Martens, Richard Shine, Oluwasanmi Oluseye Koyejo, Olaf Sporns, Russell A. Poldrack

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The human brain integrates diverse cognitive processes into a coherent whole, shifting fluidly as a function of changing environmental demands. Despite recent progress, the neurobiological mechanisms responsible for this dynamic system-level integration remain poorly understood. Here we investigated the spatial, dynamic, and molecular signatures of system-wide neural activity across a range of cognitive tasks. We found that neuronal activity converged onto a low-dimensional manifold that facilitates the execution of diverse task states. Flow within this attractor space was associated with dissociable cognitive functions, unique patterns of network-level topology, and individual differences in fluid intelligence. The axes of the low-dimensional neurocognitive architecture aligned with regional differences in the density of neuromodulatory receptors, which in turn relate to distinct signatures of network controllability estimated from the structural connectome. These results advance our understanding of functional brain organization by emphasizing the interface between neural activity, neuromodulatory systems, and cognitive function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)289-296
Number of pages8
JournalNature Neuroscience
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2019

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Cognition
Connectome
Systems Integration
Brain
Molecular Dynamics Simulation
Intelligence
Individuality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Shine, J. M., Breakspear, M., Bell, P. T., Ehgoetz Martens, K., Shine, R., Koyejo, O. O., ... Poldrack, R. A. (2019). Human cognition involves the dynamic integration of neural activity and neuromodulatory systems. Nature Neuroscience, 22(2), 289-296. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41593-018-0312-0

Human cognition involves the dynamic integration of neural activity and neuromodulatory systems. / Shine, James M.; Breakspear, Michael; Bell, Peter T.; Ehgoetz Martens, Kayla; Shine, Richard; Koyejo, Oluwasanmi Oluseye; Sporns, Olaf; Poldrack, Russell A.

In: Nature Neuroscience, Vol. 22, No. 2, 01.02.2019, p. 289-296.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shine, JM, Breakspear, M, Bell, PT, Ehgoetz Martens, K, Shine, R, Koyejo, OO, Sporns, O & Poldrack, RA 2019, 'Human cognition involves the dynamic integration of neural activity and neuromodulatory systems', Nature Neuroscience, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 289-296. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41593-018-0312-0
Shine, James M. ; Breakspear, Michael ; Bell, Peter T. ; Ehgoetz Martens, Kayla ; Shine, Richard ; Koyejo, Oluwasanmi Oluseye ; Sporns, Olaf ; Poldrack, Russell A. / Human cognition involves the dynamic integration of neural activity and neuromodulatory systems. In: Nature Neuroscience. 2019 ; Vol. 22, No. 2. pp. 289-296.
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