How urban African American young adolescents spend their time: Time budgets for locations, activities, and companionship

Reed W. Larson, Maryse H. Richards, Belinda Sims, Jodi Dworkin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The time budgets of a population of youth provide important information about their daily experience and socialization. This study reports data on the time budgets of a sample of 253 urban African American poor to working-and middle-class 5th-8th graders in Chicago. These youth were found to spend less time in school than other postindustrial adolescent populations, but spent no less time doing homework than White suburban U.S. young adolescents. They spent large quantities of time at home and with their families - at rates comparable to rates for young adolescents in a society with collectivist values like India. Unlike with other populations, early adolescence was not associated with major age changes in time allocations. Amount of time in schoolwork did not differ by grade, and amount of time with family did not show the decline with age that has been found for European American suburban adolescents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)565-597
Number of pages33
JournalAmerican journal of community psychology
Volume29
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2001

Keywords

  • African american youth
  • Early adolescence
  • Family time
  • Schoolwork
  • Time budgets
  • Urban youth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychology(all)
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

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