How much like a target can a mask be? Geometric, spatial, and temporal similarity in priming: A reply to Schlaghecken and Eimer (2006)

Alejandro Lleras, James T. Enns

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

The authors make 3 points in response to F. Schlaghecken and M. Eimer's (see record 2006-09007-009) proposal of self-inhibition as an explanatory factor in the negative compatibility effect: (a) The self-inhibition hypothesis lacks empirical support for its main tenets; (b) considering the roles of geometric, spatial, and temporal similarity of primes and masks makes self-inhibition unnecessary; and (c) the negative compatibility effect occurs even when the main tenets of self-inhibition are violated. The authors propose that understanding what is "relevant" in a masked-priming task applies not only to geometric features that are shared with the target but to spatial and temporal ones as well. Briefly, target-mask similarity determines how motor preparation is accumulated during the prime-mask sequence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)495-500
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Experimental Psychology: General
Volume135
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2006

Keywords

  • Masking
  • Object updating
  • Priming
  • Similarity
  • Suppression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Psychology(all)
  • Developmental Neuroscience

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'How much like a target can a mask be? Geometric, spatial, and temporal similarity in priming: A reply to Schlaghecken and Eimer (2006)'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this