How does the oxidative burst of macrophages kill bacteria? Still an open question

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are critical components of the antimicrobial repertoire of macrophages, yet the mechanisms by which ROS damage bacteria in the phagosome are unclear. The NADH-dependent phagocytic oxidase produces superoxide, which dismutes to form H2O2. The Barras and Méresse labs use a GFP fusion to an OxyR regulated gene to show that phagocyte-derived H2O2 is gaining access to the Salmonella cytoplasm. However, they have also shown previously that Salmonella has redundant systems to detoxify this H2O2. Although Salmonella propagate in a unique vacuole, their data suggest that ROS are not diminished in this modified phagosome. These recent results are put into the context of our overall understanding of potential oxidative bacterial damage occurring in macrophages.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)580-583
Number of pages4
JournalMolecular Microbiology
Volume80
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2011

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Respiratory Burst
Salmonella
Reactive Oxygen Species
Phagosomes
Macrophages
Bacteria
Phagocytes
Vacuoles
Superoxides
NAD
Oxidoreductases
Cytoplasm
Genes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

How does the oxidative burst of macrophages kill bacteria? Still an open question. / Slauch, James M.

In: Molecular Microbiology, Vol. 80, No. 3, 01.05.2011, p. 580-583.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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