Hippocampal System Dysfunction and Odor Discrimination Learning in Rats: Impairment or Facilitation Depending on Representational Demands

H. Eichenbaum, A. Fagan, P. Mathews, Neal J Cohen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The performance of normal rats and that of rats with hippocampal system damage were compared on acquisition of different versions of the same two-odor discrimination task that placed different encoding and representational demands on memory. Rats with fornix lesions were impaired when explicit comparisons among multiple odor cues and differential response choices were encouraged. However, when odor-cue comparison was hindered and explicit cues for response choice were eliminated, rats with fornix lesions out performed normal animals. The results support an hypothesis that the hippocampal system is critical to a memory representation based on encoding relations among multiple percepts, and other brain systems support performance adaptations based on encodings of stimuli individually.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)331-339
Number of pages9
JournalBehavioral Neuroscience
Volume102
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 1988
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Hippocampal System Dysfunction and Odor Discrimination Learning in Rats: Impairment or Facilitation Depending on Representational Demands'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this