Higher motivation-greater control? The effect of arousal on judgement

Hila Riemer, Madhu Viswanathan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This research examines control over the effect of arousal, a dimension of affect, on judgement. Past research shows that high processing motivation enhances control over the effects of affect on judgement. Isolating and studying arousal as opposed to valence, the other dimension of affect, and its effect on judgement, we identify boundary conditions for past findings. Drawing from the literature on processes by which arousal influences judgement, we demonstrate that the role of motivation is contingent upon the type of judgement task (i.e., memory- versus stimulus-based judgement). In stimulus-based judgement, individuals exert greater control over the effect of arousal on judgement under low compared to high motivation. In contrast, in memory-based judgement individuals exert greater control over the effect of arousal under high compared to low motivation. Theoretical implications and avenues for future research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)723-742
Number of pages20
JournalCognition and Emotion
Volume27
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2013

Keywords

  • Affect
  • Arousal
  • Automatic processes
  • Controlled processes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

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