Helium implantation of ultrafine grained tungsten within a TEM

K. Hattar, O. El-Atwani, M. Efe, T. J. Novakowski, A. Suslova, J. P. Allain

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Abstract

Many theoretical predictions have suggested that the confined length scales and increased interface density of various nanostructured materials may result in desired thermal, mechanical, and radiation properties. An important aspect of this for next generation nuclear reactors is understanding the change in swelling resulting from helium evolution in tungsten alloys, as a function of grain size and grain boundary type. This study investigated this using a new ion irradiation transmission electron microscope (TEM) facility that has been developed at Sandia National Laboratories and is capable of ion implanting helium at energies up to 20 keV. It was demonstrated in this feasibility study that helium could be implanted into an ultrafine grained tungsten TEM sample produced by severe plastic deformation. The size and density of the helium bubbles formed during the experiment appear nearly constant; while the larger voids formed appear to be dependent on the local microstructure. Future work is underway to both optimize the facility, as well as better understand the evolution of ultrafine grained tungsten resulting from both helium implantation and displacement damage.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalMaterials Research Society Symposium Proceedings
Volume1645
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Event2013 MRS Fall Meeting - Boston, MA, United States
Duration: Dec 1 2013Dec 6 2013

Fingerprint

Helium
Tungsten
Electrons
Nuclear Reactors
Ions
Nanostructures
Feasibility Studies
Plastics
Hot Temperature
Ultrafine
Radiation

Keywords

  • W
  • ion-implantation
  • transmission electron microscopy (TEM)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

Hattar, K., El-Atwani, O., Efe, M., Novakowski, T. J., Suslova, A., & Allain, J. P. (2014). Helium implantation of ultrafine grained tungsten within a TEM. Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings, 1645. https://doi.org/10.1557/opl.2014.323

Helium implantation of ultrafine grained tungsten within a TEM. / Hattar, K.; El-Atwani, O.; Efe, M.; Novakowski, T. J.; Suslova, A.; Allain, J. P.

In: Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings, Vol. 1645, 01.01.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Hattar, K. ; El-Atwani, O. ; Efe, M. ; Novakowski, T. J. ; Suslova, A. ; Allain, J. P. / Helium implantation of ultrafine grained tungsten within a TEM. In: Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings. 2014 ; Vol. 1645.
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