Health behaviors and obesity among US children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder by gender and medication use

Juhee Kim, Bala Mutyala, Stamatis Agiovlasitis, Bo Fernhall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: We examined the levels of physical activity, sedentary behaviors, and obesity among children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) by gender and medication use and estimated the associations between health behaviors and obesity. Methods: Cross-sectional analysis of children 6-17. years-old enrolled in the National Survey of Children's Health 2003 (n = 66,707). Odds ratios were adjusted for multistage-sampling and survey-design effects. Results: ADHD prevalence was 8.6%. In general, children with ADHD engaged in less physical activity, organized sports, and reading than their counterparts. Children with ADHD had increased risk of obesity for boys [24.9% vs. 21.6%, OR(95% CI): 1.42(1.13-1.77)] and girls [21.9% vs. 16%, 1.85(1.26-2.73)], if not medicated. Only girls with ADHD and not on medication were more likely to have higher media time (52.7% vs. 42%) and this was associated with higher odds for obesity [27.7% vs. 19.5%, 2.51 (1.24-5.08)]. Children with ADHD on medication had higher prevalence of depression than those not taking medication [boys: 29.5% vs. 26.3%; girls: 30.9% vs. 23.6%] and the odds of being depressed remained significant after controlling for obesity [boys: 1.45 (1.09-1.94); girls: 2.27 (1.48-3.49)]. Conclusions: Health promotion and obesity prevention programs targeting children with ADHD should take gender and medication use into consideration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)218-222
Number of pages5
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume52
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2011

Keywords

  • ADHD
  • Depression
  • Medication
  • National survey of children's health (NSCH)
  • Obesity
  • Physical activity
  • Sedentary behaviors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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