Growth at elevated ozone or elevated carbon dioxide concentration alters antioxidant capacity and response to acute oxidative stress in soybean (Glycine max)

Kelly M. Gillespie, Alistair Rogers, Elizabeth Ainsworth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Soybeans (Glycine max Merr.) were grown at elevated carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]) or chronic elevated ozone concentration ([O3]; 90ppb), and then exposed to an acute O3 stress (200ppb for 4h) in order to test the hypothesis that the atmospheric environment alters the total antioxidant capacity of plants, and their capacity to respond to an acute oxidative stress. Total antioxidant metabolism, antioxidant enzyme activity, and antioxidant transcript abundance were characterized before, immediately after, and during recovery from the acute O3 treatment. Growth at chronic elevated [O3] increased the total antioxidant capacity of plants, while growth at elevated [CO2] decreased the total antioxidant capacity. Changes in total antioxidant capacity were matched by changes in ascorbate content, but not phenolic content. The growth environment significantly altered the pattern of antioxidant transcript and enzyme response to the acute O3 stress. Following the acute oxidative stress, there was an immediate transcriptional reprogramming that allowed for maintained or increased antioxidant enzyme activities in plants grown at elevated [O3]. Growth at elevated [CO2] appeared to increase the response of antioxidant enzymes to acute oxidative stress, but dampened and delayed the transcriptional response. These results provide evidence that the growth environment alters the antioxidant system, the immediate response to an acute oxidative stress, and the timing over which plants return to initial antioxidant levels. The results also indicate that future elevated [CO2] and [O3] will differentially affect the antioxidant system.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2667-2678
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of experimental botany
Volume62
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2011

Fingerprint

Ozone
Soybeans
ozone
Carbon Dioxide
Glycine max
Oxidative Stress
oxidative stress
Antioxidants
carbon dioxide
soybeans
antioxidants
Growth
Enzymes
enzyme activity
enzymes

Keywords

  • Antioxidant metabolism
  • ascorbate
  • dehydroascorbate reductase
  • glutathione reductase
  • oxidative stress
  • ozone pollution

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Plant Science

Cite this

Growth at elevated ozone or elevated carbon dioxide concentration alters antioxidant capacity and response to acute oxidative stress in soybean (Glycine max). / Gillespie, Kelly M.; Rogers, Alistair; Ainsworth, Elizabeth.

In: Journal of experimental botany, Vol. 62, No. 8, 01.05.2011, p. 2667-2678.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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