Grit is associated with food security among US parents and adolescents

Cassandra J. Nikolaus, Megan Schierer, Brenna Ellison, Heather A. Eicher-Miller, Craig Gundersen, Sharon M. Nickols-Richardson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: We investigated whether the Short Grit Scale (Grit-S) predicted odds of food insecurity (FI) among adults and their children. Methods: A cross-sectional panel of parent-child dyads completed an online questionnaire. Eligible dyads included parents with household income below the 2015 median ($52,250 USD/year) and their self-selected household child between the ages of 13 to 17 years. An online questionnaire assessed: (1) FI using the 18-item Household Food Security Survey Module and the Food Security Survey Module for Youth; (2) perseverance and determination using the validated 8-item Grit-S; and (3) sociodemographic FI predictors. Logit regression models estimated the relationship between odds of FI and predictors among parents and children, separately. Results: Among 252 parents, 61.1% reported household FI. Parents’ Grit-S score (N = 179) was associated with a significantly lower odds of household FI (OR= 0.4; 95%CI= 0.2, 0.8; p < .01) while adjusting for established predictors. Mean (±SD) Grit-S was 3.1 (±0.7). Children’s Grit-S score (N = 178) was associated with a significantly lower odds of child FI (OR= 0.6; 95%CI= 0.4, 0.9; p < .05) while adjusting for established predictors. Conclusions: Perseverance and determination, also known as “grit,” may be one further explanation for why some poor households are food secure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)207-218
Number of pages12
JournalAmerican journal of health behavior
Volume43
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2019

Keywords

  • Food
  • Food security
  • Grit
  • Hunger
  • Perseverance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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