Greater antioxidant and respiratory metabolism in field-grown soybean exposed to elevated O3 under both ambient and elevated CO2

Kelly M. Gillespie, Fangxiu Xu, Katherine T. Richter, Justin M. Mcgrath, R. J.Cody Markelz, Donald Richard Ort, Andrew Leakey, Elizabeth Ainsworth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Antioxidant metabolism is responsive to environmental conditions, and is proposed to be a key component of ozone (O3) tolerance in plants. Tropospheric O3 concentration ([O3]) has doubled since the Industrial Revolution and will increase further if precursor emissions rise as expected over this century. Additionally, atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2]) is increasing at an unprecedented rate and will surpass 550ppm by 2050. This study investigated the molecular, biochemical and physiological changes in soybean exposed to elevated [O3] in a background of ambient [CO2] and elevated [CO2] in the field. Previously, it has been difficult to demonstrate any link between antioxidant defences and O3 stress under field conditions. However, this study used principle components analysis to separate variability in [O3] from variability in other environmental conditions (temperature, light and relative humidity). Subsequent analysis of covariance determined that soybean antioxidant metabolism increased with increasing [O3], in both ambient and elevated [CO2]. The transcriptional response was dampened at elevated [CO2], consistent with lower stomatal conductance and lower O3 flux into leaves. Energetically expensive increases in antioxidant metabolism and tetrapyrrole synthesis at elevated [O3] were associated with greater transcript levels of enzymes involved in respiratory metabolism. This study investigated the molecular, biochemical and physiological changes in soybean exposed to elevated [O3] in a background of ambient [CO2] and elevated [CO2] in the field. Principle components analysis was used to separate variability in [O3] from variability in other environmental conditions (temperature, light and relative humidity). The key results show that energetically expensive increases in antioxidant metabolism and tetrapyrrole synthesis at elevated [O3] were supported by greater respiratory metabolism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)169-184
Number of pages16
JournalPlant, Cell and Environment
Volume35
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

Fingerprint

Soybeans
Antioxidants
soybeans
antioxidants
metabolism
Tetrapyrroles
Humidity
environmental factors
relative humidity
principal component analysis
Light
Temperature
synthesis
Ozone
ozone
stomatal conductance
temperature
antioxidant activity
Enzymes
enzymes

Keywords

  • Climate change
  • Free air concentration enrichment (FACE)
  • Glycine max
  • Principal components analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Plant Science

Cite this

Greater antioxidant and respiratory metabolism in field-grown soybean exposed to elevated O3 under both ambient and elevated CO2 . / Gillespie, Kelly M.; Xu, Fangxiu; Richter, Katherine T.; Mcgrath, Justin M.; Markelz, R. J.Cody; Ort, Donald Richard; Leakey, Andrew; Ainsworth, Elizabeth.

In: Plant, Cell and Environment, Vol. 35, No. 1, 01.01.2012, p. 169-184.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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