Graded dietary resistant starch concentrations on apparent total tract macronutrient digestibility and fecal fermentative end products and microbial populations of healthy adult dogs

Alison N. Beloshapka, Tzu Wen L. Cross, Kelly S. Swanson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Resistant starch (RS) is fermentable by gut microbiota and effectively modulates fecal short-chain fatty acid concentrations in pigs, mice, and humans. RS may have similar beneficial effects on the canine gut but has not been well studied. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of 0%, 1%, 2%, 3%, and 4% dietary RS (Hi-maize 260) on apparent total tract macronutrient digestibility, fecal characteristics, fermentative end-product concentrations, and microbiota of healthy adult dogs. An incomplete 5 × 5 Latin square design with seven dogs and five experimental periods was used, with each treatment period lasting 21 d (days 0 to 17 adaptation; days 18 to 21 fresh and total fecal collection) and each dog serving as its own control. Seven dogs (mean age = 5.3 yr; mean body weight = 20 kg) were randomly allotted to one of five treatments formulated to be iso-energetic and consisting of graded amounts of 100% amylopectin cornstarch, RS, and cellulose and fed as a top dressing on the food each day. All dogs were fed the same amount of a basal diet throughout the study, and fresh water was offered ad libitum. The basal diet contained 6.25% RS (dry matter [DM] basis), contributing approximately 18.3 g of RS/d based on their daily food intake (292.5 g DM/d). Data were evaluated for linear and quadratic effects using SAS. The treatments included 0%, 1%, 2%, 3%, and 4% of an additional RS source. Because Hi-maize 260 is approximately 40% digestible and 60% indigestible starch, the dogs received the following amounts of RS daily: 0% = 18.3 g (18.3 + 0 g), 1% = 20.1 g (18.3 + 1.8 g), 2% = 21.9 g (18.3 + 3.6 g), 3% = 23.7 g (18.3 + 5.4 g), and 4% = 25.5 g (18.3 + 7.2 g). Apparent total tract DM, organic matter, crude protein, fat, and gross energy digestibilities and fecal pH were linearly decreased (P < 0.05) with increased RS consumption. Fecal output was linearly increased (P < 0.05) with increased RS consumption. Fecal scores and fecal fermentative end-product concentrations were not affected by RS consumption. Although most of the fecal microbial taxa were not altered, Faecalibacterium were increased (P < 0.05) with increased RS consumption. The decrease in fecal pH and increase in fecal Faecalibacterium would be viewed as being beneficial to gastrointestinal health. Although our results seem to indicate that RS is poorly and/or slowly fermentable in dogs, the lack of observed change may have been due to the rather high level of RS contained in the basal diet.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of animal science
Volume99
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2021

Keywords

  • canine
  • gut health
  • gut microbiota

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Genetics

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Graded dietary resistant starch concentrations on apparent total tract macronutrient digestibility and fecal fermentative end products and microbial populations of healthy adult dogs'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this