Glacial history reflected by geochemically constrained stratigraphic sections in the Chaudière River drainage basin of the Canadian Appalachians

William W. Shilts, Olivier J. Caron

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The Chaudière River region in the Appalachian Mountains of eastern Canada is approximately 700 km north of the southernmost Pleistocene glacial deposits in New York and New Jersey. Detailed compositional analyses of glacial and non-glacial sediments from stratigraphic exposures and more than 40 boreholes drilled to bedrock provide a compositionally constrained record of glacial events, which include deposits of one Marine Oxygen Isotope Stage (MIS) 6 and two post-MIS 5 glaciations. The glacial and associated proglacial deposits rest on compositionally distinctive, preglacial saprolite that is preserved in deeper valleys. These observations constrain interpretations of the glacial/Pleistocene history of the eastern United States and Canada. The fact that there is no unequivocal evidence of pre-MIS 6 till in the Chaudière River region, while there are well-documented pre-MIS 6 glacial deposits south of there and in the American Midwest, also has major climatic implications. The Laurentide Ice Sheet and its ancestors must have been more robust in the west in the early Pleistocene and in the east most recently.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)234-249
Number of pages16
JournalQuaternary Research (United States)
Volume91
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Keywords

  • Appalachian glacial stratigraphy
  • Geochemistry
  • Glacial deformation
  • Glacial lakes
  • Interglacial
  • Laurentide Ice Sheet
  • Melt-out
  • Nickel dispersal
  • Sangamon
  • Till

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Earth-Surface Processes
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

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