Getting ahead by staying put? Specialization and social capital in U.S. civil service careers

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

This empirical paper shows that generalists are compensated at higher salary levels than specialists, defined by the number of occupations held, in the US federal civil service over the period from 1989 to 2011. Meaningful positive returns to occupational generalization occur only beyond the fifth year of employment. One potential explanation of this generalist advantage—the role of generalists as coordinators—is tested. Findings are consistent with a model of capabilities and coordination, though future research will need to consider other important factors, especially social capital development over the career.

Original languageEnglish (US)
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018
Externally publishedYes
Event78th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, AOM 2018 - Chicago, United States
Duration: Aug 10 2018Aug 14 2018

Other

Other78th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, AOM 2018
CountryUnited States
CityChicago
Period8/10/188/14/18

Fingerprint

Wages
Factors
Social capital
Salary
Civil service

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Management Information Systems
  • Management of Technology and Innovation
  • Industrial relations

Cite this

Bruce, J. R. (2018). Getting ahead by staying put? Specialization and social capital in U.S. civil service careers. Paper presented at 78th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, AOM 2018, Chicago, United States. https://doi.org/10.5465/AMBPP.2018.22

Getting ahead by staying put? Specialization and social capital in U.S. civil service careers. / Bruce, Joshua R.

2018. Paper presented at 78th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, AOM 2018, Chicago, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Bruce, JR 2018, 'Getting ahead by staying put? Specialization and social capital in U.S. civil service careers', Paper presented at 78th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, AOM 2018, Chicago, United States, 8/10/18 - 8/14/18. https://doi.org/10.5465/AMBPP.2018.22
Bruce JR. Getting ahead by staying put? Specialization and social capital in U.S. civil service careers. 2018. Paper presented at 78th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, AOM 2018, Chicago, United States. https://doi.org/10.5465/AMBPP.2018.22
Bruce, Joshua R. / Getting ahead by staying put? Specialization and social capital in U.S. civil service careers. Paper presented at 78th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, AOM 2018, Chicago, United States.
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