Geomorphic expression of the Illinois episode glaciation (marine isotope stage 6) in Illinois: Moraines, sublobes, subglacial lineations, and possible ice streaming

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

In the central United States, the Laurentide ice sheet advanced considerably farther south and west during the Illinois Episode (marine isotope stage [MIS] 6) in Illinois than during the Wisconsin Episode (MIS 2). The Illinois Episode landscape, beyond the last glacial margin, is thus relatively undisturbed from its original form, with only a drape of last glacial loess on uplands, resulting in some of the best preserved geomorphic features of the MIS 6 Laurentide ice sheet. Recent field observations and high-resolution digital elevation maps have led to new ideas about how an ancestral Lake Michigan Lobe reached its southernmost Pleistocene extent (ca. 150- 140 ka) and about the region's deglacial history. Illinois Episode moraines are notably more narrow and discontinuous than last glacial moraines in northeastern Illinois. Subglacial lineations in Illinois, formed during the Illinois Episode, include a continuum from drumlins and megaflutes to megascale lineations. Crag-and-tail forms are most apparent in southeastern Illinois, influenced by buried Paleozoic bedrock obstacles. In north-central Illinois, megaflutes and drumlins occur in an area of thick glacial drift (>20 m). During deglaciation, an MIS 6 Lake Michigan Lobe likely separated into sublobes as the ice sheet thinned and basal ice conditions became warmer and wetter. Ice streaming into the Kaskaskia River Basin, southwestern Illinois, is envisioned during this period. Factors that likely contributed to faster glacial flow in the basin include the regional topography, a relatively soft and fine-grained substrate, and the subglacial hydrology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationSpecial Paper of the Geological Society of America
PublisherGeological Society of America
Pages1-25
Number of pages25
ISBN (Electronic)9780813795300
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 30 2018

Publication series

NameSpecial Paper of the Geological Society of America
Volume530
ISSN (Print)0072-1077

Fingerprint

marine isotope stage
lineation
glaciation
Last Glacial
ice
drumlin
Laurentide Ice Sheet
basal ice
lake
deglaciation
loess
ice sheet
bedrock
hydrology
Paleozoic
river basin
topography
Pleistocene
substrate
history

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geology

Cite this

Grimley, D. A., Phillips, A. C., McKay, E. D., & Anders, A. M. (2018). Geomorphic expression of the Illinois episode glaciation (marine isotope stage 6) in Illinois: Moraines, sublobes, subglacial lineations, and possible ice streaming. In Special Paper of the Geological Society of America (pp. 1-25). (Special Paper of the Geological Society of America; Vol. 530). Geological Society of America. https://doi.org/10.1130/2017.2530(01)

Geomorphic expression of the Illinois episode glaciation (marine isotope stage 6) in Illinois : Moraines, sublobes, subglacial lineations, and possible ice streaming. / Grimley, David Aaron; Phillips, Andrew C; McKay, E. D.; Anders, Alison M.

Special Paper of the Geological Society of America. Geological Society of America, 2018. p. 1-25 (Special Paper of the Geological Society of America; Vol. 530).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Grimley, DA, Phillips, AC, McKay, ED & Anders, AM 2018, Geomorphic expression of the Illinois episode glaciation (marine isotope stage 6) in Illinois: Moraines, sublobes, subglacial lineations, and possible ice streaming. in Special Paper of the Geological Society of America. Special Paper of the Geological Society of America, vol. 530, Geological Society of America, pp. 1-25. https://doi.org/10.1130/2017.2530(01)
Grimley DA, Phillips AC, McKay ED, Anders AM. Geomorphic expression of the Illinois episode glaciation (marine isotope stage 6) in Illinois: Moraines, sublobes, subglacial lineations, and possible ice streaming. In Special Paper of the Geological Society of America. Geological Society of America. 2018. p. 1-25. (Special Paper of the Geological Society of America). https://doi.org/10.1130/2017.2530(01)
Grimley, David Aaron ; Phillips, Andrew C ; McKay, E. D. ; Anders, Alison M. / Geomorphic expression of the Illinois episode glaciation (marine isotope stage 6) in Illinois : Moraines, sublobes, subglacial lineations, and possible ice streaming. Special Paper of the Geological Society of America. Geological Society of America, 2018. pp. 1-25 (Special Paper of the Geological Society of America).
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