Geodesign processes and ecological systems thinking in a coupled human-environment context: An integrated framework for landscape architecture

Yexuan Gu, Brian Deal, Linda Larsen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Scholars from a variety of disciplines have been working to unravel the complexities of geodesign as an approach to tackling a host of problems. We argue that a mature understanding of geodesign requires a systemic perspective to organize the interconnections between ecological, social and economic conditions at multiple spatial and temporal scales. We reviewed definitions and perspectives of geodesign and key concepts of ecological systems thinking to develop a new framework for landscape architecture. We provide the state-of-the-art in geodesign within the context of systems thinking and coupled human-environmental resilience. We show that geodesign is capable to encourage public participation and interdisciplinary collaboration through its systemic planning processes and synergetic technologies. The thrust of geodesign-related research is the emerging paradigm of landscape-based sustainability. While landscape architecture is complex in many aspects, the integrated framework promotes our understanding about its social-ecological potential, spatial-temporal association and resilience of coupled human-environment systems. Based on the findings, we outline key contributions, implications, challenges and recommendations for future research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number3306
JournalSustainability (Switzerland)
Volume10
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 15 2018

Keywords

  • Geodesign
  • Human-environment systems
  • Landscape-based sustainability
  • Social-ecological processes
  • Spatial-temporal patterns
  • Sustainable design
  • Systems thinking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

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