Genetic selection of mice for high voluntary wheel running: Effect on skeletal muscle glucose uptake

C. L. Dumke, J. S. Rhodes, T. Garland, E. Maslowski, J. G. Swallow, A. C. Wetter, G. D. Cartee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Effects of genetic selection for high wheel-running activity (17th generation) and access to running wheels on skeletal muscle glucose uptake were studied in mice with the following treatments for 8 wk: 1) access to unlocked wheels; 2) same as 1, but wheels locked 48 h before glucose uptake measurement; or 3) wheels always locked. Selected mice ran more than random-bred (nonselected) mice (8-wk mean ± SE = 8,243 ± 711 vs. 3,719 ± 233 revolutions/day). Body weight was 5-13% lower for selected vs. nonselected groups. Fat pad/body weight was ∼40% lower for selected vs. nonselected and unlocked vs. locked groups. Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and fat pad/body weight were inversely correlated for isolated soleus (r = -0.333; P < 0.005) but not extensor digitorum longus (EDL) or epitrochlearis muscles. Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake was higher in EDL (P < 0.02) for selected vs. nonselected mice. Glucose uptake did not differ by wheel group, and amount of running did not correlate with glucose uptake for any muscle. Wheel running by mice did not enhance subsequent glucose uptake by isolated muscles.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1289-1297
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume91
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Artificial selection
  • Exercise
  • Glucose transport
  • Insulin sensitivity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

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