Genetic and environmental effects of serial naming and phonological awareness on early reading outcomes

Stephen A. Petrill, Kirby Deater-Deckard, Lee Anne Thompson, Laura S. DeThorne, Christopher Schatschneider

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

The current study involved 281 early-school-age twin pairs (118 monozygotic, 163 same-sex dizygotic) participating in the ongoing Western Reserve Reading Project (S. A. Petrill, K. Deater-Deckard, L. A. Thompson, & C. Schatschneider, 2006). Twins were tested in their homes by separate examiners on a battery of reading-related skills including phonological awareness, rapid automatized naming, word knowledge, and phonological decoding. Results suggested that a core genetic factor accounted for a significant portion of the covariance between phonological awareness, rapid naming, and reading outcomes. However, shared environmental influences related to phonological awareness were also associated with reading skills.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)112-121
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Educational Psychology
Volume98
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2006

Keywords

  • Development
  • Genetics
  • Phonological awareness
  • Reading

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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