Genetic ablation of carotene oxygenases and consumption of lycopene or tomato powder diets modulate carotenoid and lipid metabolism in mice

Nikki A. Ford, Amy C. Elsen, John W. Erdman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Carotene-15,15'-monooxygenase (CMO-I) cleaves β-carotene to form vitamin A, whereas carotene-9',10'-monooxygenase (CMO-II) preferentially cleaves non-provitamin A carotenoids. Recent reports indicate that β-carotene metabolites regulate dietary lipid uptake, whereas lycopene regulates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor expression. To determine the physiologic consequences of carotenoids and their interactions with CMO-I and CMO-II, we characterized mammalian carotenoid metabolism, metabolic perturbations, and lipid metabolism in female CMO-I-/- and CMO-II-/- mice fed lycopene or tomato-containing diets for 30 days. We hypothesized that there would be significant interactions between diet and genotype on carotenoid accumulation and lipid parameters. CMO-I-/- mice had higher levels of leptin, insulin, and hepatic lipidosis but lower levels of serum cholesterol. CMO-II-/- mice had increased tissue lycopene and phytofluene accumulation, reduced insulin-like growth factor 1 levels and cholesterol levels, but elevated liver lipids and cholesterol compared with wild-type mice. The diets did not modulate these genotypic perturbations, but lycopene and tomato powder significantly decreased serum insulin-like growth factor 1. Tomato powder also increased hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor expression, independent of genotype. These data point to the pleiotropic actions of CMO-I and CMO-II supporting a strong role of these proteins in regulating tissue carotenoid accumulation and the lipid metabolic phenotype as well as tomato carotenoid-independent regulation of lipid metabolism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)733-742
Number of pages10
JournalNutrition Research
Volume33
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2013

Keywords

  • CMO-I
  • CMO-II
  • Cholesterol
  • Lipids
  • Lycopene
  • Mice
  • Phytoene
  • Tomato

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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