Gender divide and acceptance of collaborative Web 2.0 applications for learning in higher education

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Situated in the gender digital divide framework, this survey study investigated the role of computer anxiety in influencing female college students' perceptions toward Web 2.0 applications for learning. Based on 432 college students' Web 2.0 for learning perception ratings collected by relevant categories of Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT), the study revealed certain significant differences between genders on six Web 2.0 applications (blog, wiki, social networking tool, online video sharing tool, online game, and immersive virtual environment). Overall females felt more anxious of using Web 2.0 applications than males. However, such difference was not found on social networking tools and online video sharing tools. Therefore we contended that features of social networking tools and online video sharing might promote females' use of Web 2.0 applications. Future studies will cultivate the empirical relationship between genders and underlying learning processes afforded by Web 2.0 features.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)57-65
Number of pages9
JournalInternet and Higher Education
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

Fingerprint

acceptance
Education
gender
learning
networking
education
video
Students
Blogs
digital divide
Virtual reality
weblog
learning process
gender-specific factors
student
rating
anxiety

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Gender difference
  • Higher education
  • Technology acceptance level
  • Web 2.0

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Education

Cite this

Gender divide and acceptance of collaborative Web 2.0 applications for learning in higher education. / Huang, Wen-Hao; Hood, Denice Ward; Yoo, Sun Joo.

In: Internet and Higher Education, Vol. 16, No. 1, 01.01.2013, p. 57-65.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{2aa850510fb34460b787bcb75fb62225,
title = "Gender divide and acceptance of collaborative Web 2.0 applications for learning in higher education",
abstract = "Situated in the gender digital divide framework, this survey study investigated the role of computer anxiety in influencing female college students' perceptions toward Web 2.0 applications for learning. Based on 432 college students' Web 2.0 for learning perception ratings collected by relevant categories of Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT), the study revealed certain significant differences between genders on six Web 2.0 applications (blog, wiki, social networking tool, online video sharing tool, online game, and immersive virtual environment). Overall females felt more anxious of using Web 2.0 applications than males. However, such difference was not found on social networking tools and online video sharing tools. Therefore we contended that features of social networking tools and online video sharing might promote females' use of Web 2.0 applications. Future studies will cultivate the empirical relationship between genders and underlying learning processes afforded by Web 2.0 features.",
keywords = "Anxiety, Gender difference, Higher education, Technology acceptance level, Web 2.0",
author = "Wen-Hao Huang and Hood, {Denice Ward} and Yoo, {Sun Joo}",
year = "2013",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.iheduc.2012.02.001",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "16",
pages = "57--65",
journal = "Internet and Higher Education",
issn = "1096-7516",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Gender divide and acceptance of collaborative Web 2.0 applications for learning in higher education

AU - Huang, Wen-Hao

AU - Hood, Denice Ward

AU - Yoo, Sun Joo

PY - 2013/1/1

Y1 - 2013/1/1

N2 - Situated in the gender digital divide framework, this survey study investigated the role of computer anxiety in influencing female college students' perceptions toward Web 2.0 applications for learning. Based on 432 college students' Web 2.0 for learning perception ratings collected by relevant categories of Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT), the study revealed certain significant differences between genders on six Web 2.0 applications (blog, wiki, social networking tool, online video sharing tool, online game, and immersive virtual environment). Overall females felt more anxious of using Web 2.0 applications than males. However, such difference was not found on social networking tools and online video sharing tools. Therefore we contended that features of social networking tools and online video sharing might promote females' use of Web 2.0 applications. Future studies will cultivate the empirical relationship between genders and underlying learning processes afforded by Web 2.0 features.

AB - Situated in the gender digital divide framework, this survey study investigated the role of computer anxiety in influencing female college students' perceptions toward Web 2.0 applications for learning. Based on 432 college students' Web 2.0 for learning perception ratings collected by relevant categories of Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT), the study revealed certain significant differences between genders on six Web 2.0 applications (blog, wiki, social networking tool, online video sharing tool, online game, and immersive virtual environment). Overall females felt more anxious of using Web 2.0 applications than males. However, such difference was not found on social networking tools and online video sharing tools. Therefore we contended that features of social networking tools and online video sharing might promote females' use of Web 2.0 applications. Future studies will cultivate the empirical relationship between genders and underlying learning processes afforded by Web 2.0 features.

KW - Anxiety

KW - Gender difference

KW - Higher education

KW - Technology acceptance level

KW - Web 2.0

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84869501794&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84869501794&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.iheduc.2012.02.001

DO - 10.1016/j.iheduc.2012.02.001

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84869501794

VL - 16

SP - 57

EP - 65

JO - Internet and Higher Education

JF - Internet and Higher Education

SN - 1096-7516

IS - 1

ER -