Galnt17 loss-of-function leads to developmental delay and abnormal coordination, activity, and social interactions with cerebellar vermis pathology

Chih Ying Chen, Christopher H. Seward, Yunshu Song, Manasi Inamdar, Analise M. Leddy, Huimin Zhang, Jennifer Yoo, Wei Chun Kao, Hanna Pawlowski, Lisa J. Stubbs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

GALNT17 encodes a N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase (GalNAc-T) protein specifically involved in mucin-type O-linked glycosylation of target proteins, a process important for cell adhesion, cell signaling, neurotransmitter activity, neurite outgrowth, and neurite sensing. GALNT17, also known as WBSCR17, is located at the edge of the Williams-Beuren Syndrome (WBS) critical region and adjacent to the AUTS2 locus, genomic regions associated with neurodevelopmental phenotypes that are thought to be co-regulated. Although previous data have implicated Galnt17 in neurodevelopment, the in vivo functions of this gene have not been investigated. In this study, we have analyzed behavioral, brain pathology, and molecular phenotypes exhibited by Galnt17 knockout (Galnt17−/−) mice. We show that Galnt17−/− mutants exhibit developmental neuropathology within the cerebellar vermis, along with abnormal activity, coordination, and social interaction deficits. Transcriptomic and protein analysis revealed reductions in both mucin type O-glycosylation and heparan sulfate synthesis in the developing mutant cerebellum along with disruption of pathways central to neuron differentiation, axon pathfinding, and synaptic signaling, consistent with the mutant neuropathology. These brain and behavioral phenotypes and molecular data confirm a specific role for Galnt17 in brain development and suggest new clues to factors that could contribute to phenotypes in certain WBS and AUTS2 syndrome patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)155-171
Number of pages17
JournalDevelopmental Biology
Volume490
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2022

Keywords

  • Motor coordination
  • Mouse mutation
  • O-glycosylation
  • Social behavior
  • Vermis development

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology
  • Developmental Biology

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