Fruit and vegetable fiber fermentation by gut microflora from canines

K. S. Swanson, C. M. Grieshop, G. M. Clapper, R. G. Shields, T. Belay, N. R. Merchen, G. C. Fahey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The objective of this study was to assess fermentability by canine gut microflora to include short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) production, organic matter (OM) disappearance, and gas production of vegetable and fruit fiber sources compared to fiber standards (psyllium, citrus pectin, and Solka Floc). Fiber sources included apple pomace, carrot pomace, flaxseed fruit blend (mixture of peach, almond, nectarine, and plum), grape pomace, pea hulls, pistachio, and tomato pomace. Substrates were fermented in vitro for 4, 12, and 24 h with fecal flora obtained from three healthy dogs. Citrus pectin had the highest OM disappearance, SCFA production, and gas production at all times of fermentation; psyllium was intermediate and Solka Floc was lowest. A wide variation in fermentability was noted among the vegetable and fruit fiber sources. Apple pomace, carrot pomace, and flaxseed had the greatest fermentability as assessed by OM disappearance. Pea hulls and tomato pomace had intermediate OM disappearances, and fruit blend, grape pomace, and pistachio were poorly fermented. Carrot pomace produced the largest amounts of gas and SCFA. Apple pomace produced high concentrations of gas but intermediate concentrations of SCFA. Pea hulls and tomato pomace produced intermediate concentrations of gas and SCFA, whereas flaxseed, fruit blend, grape pomace, and pistachio produced low amounts of these fermentation products. For all substrates collectively, OM disappearance was highly correlated with both gas production (r2 = 0.782 and 0.723 for 12- and 24-h values, respectively) and SCFA production (r2 = 0.737 and 0.738 for 12- and 24-h values, respectively). In general, OM disappearance, gas production, and SCFA production were related to the insoluble:soluble fiber ratio in the samples; as the insoluble:soluble ratio decreased (increased soluble fiber), the OM disappearance, gas production, and SCFA production increased.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)919-926
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of animal science
Volume79
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2001

Keywords

  • Canidae
  • Fermentation
  • Fiber
  • Fruit
  • Vegetables

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Genetics

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  • Cite this

    Swanson, K. S., Grieshop, C. M., Clapper, G. M., Shields, R. G., Belay, T., Merchen, N. R., & Fahey, G. C. (2001). Fruit and vegetable fiber fermentation by gut microflora from canines. Journal of animal science, 79(4), 919-926. https://doi.org/10.2527/2001.794919x