Frontoparietal traffic signals: A fast optical imaging study of preparatory dynamics in response mode switching

Pauline L. Baniqued, Kathy A. Low, Monica Fabiani, Gabriele Gratton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Coordination between networks of brain regions is important for optimal cognitive performance, especially in attention demanding tasks. With the event-related optical signal (a measure of changes in optical scattering because of neuronal activity) we can characterize rapidly evolving network processes by examining the millisecond-scale temporal correlation of activity in distinct regions during the preparatory period of a response mode switching task. Participants received a precue indicating whether to respond vocally or manually. They then saw or heard the letter "L" or "R," indicating a "left" or "right" response to be implemented with the appropriate response modality. We employed lagged cross-correlations to characterize the dynamic connectivity of preparatory processes. Our results confirmed coupling of frontal and parietal cortices and the trial-dependent relationship of the right frontal cortex with response preparation areas. The frontal-to-modality-specific cortex cross-correlations revealed a pattern in which first irrelevant regions were deactivated, and then relevant regions were activated. These results provide a window into the subsecond scale network interactions that flexibly tune to task demands.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)887-902
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Cognitive Neuroscience
Volume25
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

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Optical Imaging
Frontal Lobe
traffic
Parietal Lobe
brain
Brain
event
interaction
performance
Traffic
Optical
Imaging
Cortex
Modality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

Cite this

Frontoparietal traffic signals : A fast optical imaging study of preparatory dynamics in response mode switching. / Baniqued, Pauline L.; Low, Kathy A.; Fabiani, Monica; Gratton, Gabriele.

In: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, Vol. 25, No. 6, 2013, p. 887-902.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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