Front-fixing model of turbidity currents at river deltas in lakes and reservoirs

Svetlana Kostic, Gary Parker

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Sand-bed rivers form deltas when they reach standing bodies of water such as lakes and reservoirs. Most sand-bed rivers carry much more mud as wash load than they do sand as bed material load. Deltas typically form so that the sand falls out fluvially in a low-slope topset deposit and "avalanches" to form a much steeper prograding foreset deposit. The mud deposits out in a low-slope bottomset on the bed the lake or reservoir. Here the case of a sand-mud delta with co-evolving parts is treated numerically using a moving-boundary technique. Although the results reported here are preliminary, the simulated morphology shows a striking resemblance to e.g. the delta of the Colorado River in Lake Mead. Copyright ASCE 2004.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationJoint Conference on Water Resource Engineering and Water Resources Planning and Management 2000
Subtitle of host publicationBuilding Partnerships
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2004
Externally publishedYes
EventJoint Conference on Water Resource Engineering and Water Resources Planning and Management 2000 - Minneapolis, MN, United States
Duration: Jul 30 2000Aug 2 2000

Publication series

NameJoint Conference on Water Resource Engineering and Water Resources Planning and Management 2000: Building Partnerships
Volume104

Other

OtherJoint Conference on Water Resource Engineering and Water Resources Planning and Management 2000
CountryUnited States
CityMinneapolis, MN
Period7/30/008/2/00

Keywords

  • Currents
  • Deltas
  • Lakes
  • Morphology
  • Reservoirs
  • Sand
  • Simulation
  • Turbidity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Geography, Planning and Development

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  • Cite this

    Kostic, S., & Parker, G. (2004). Front-fixing model of turbidity currents at river deltas in lakes and reservoirs. In Joint Conference on Water Resource Engineering and Water Resources Planning and Management 2000: Building Partnerships (Joint Conference on Water Resource Engineering and Water Resources Planning and Management 2000: Building Partnerships; Vol. 104). https://doi.org/10.1061/40517(2000)283