Frequency of the HAL-1843 mutation of the ryanodine receptor gene in dead and nonambulatory-noninjured pigs on arrival at the packing plant

M. J. Ritter, M. Ellis, G. R. Hollis, F. K. McKeith, D. G. Orellana, P. Van Genugten, S. E. Curtis, J. M. Schlipf

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Four Midwestern packing plants (designated as plants A, B, C, and D) were visited on 53 occasions, and tissue samples were collected postmortem from a total of 2,019 pigs to determine the frequency of the HAL-1843 mutation of the ryanodine receptor gene in dead (DOA), nonambulatory-noninjured (NANI), and normal animals. The sampled pigs came from approximately 130,000 animals from 454 farms and were transported on 861 trailer loads, with an average of 152 pigs/load and an average pig live BW/load of 125 (SD 7.02) kg/pig. Frequency of animals with the HAL-1843 mutation was low, with only 2.7% of the pigs being either homozygous recessives (nn, 0.45%) or carriers (Nn, 2.3%) for the mutation and 97.3% of the pigs being homozygous for the normal allele (NN). The mutation was present in all 3 classes of pig, with 1.8% of normal, 1.8% of NANI, and 4.7% of DOA animals having at least 1 copy. Two of the plants (A and C) had a greater frequency (P < 0.05) of carrier (3.7 and 3.5 vs. 1.1 and 1.0 for plants A and C vs. B and D, respectively) and homozygous recessive (1.0 and 0.9 vs. 0.0 and 0.0, respectively) animals than the others (plants B and D). There was a greater frequency (P < 0.05) of carriers in DOA animals than in the normal or NANI pigs (3.7 vs. 1.7 and 1.5 for DOA vs. normal and NANI, respectively). The 55 pigs that had at least 1 copy of the mutation came from 53 farms; therefore, the mutation was relatively widespread, being present in approximately 11% of the farms sampled. Although the HAL-1843 mutation is still present in commercial pig populations in the United States, its low frequency in DOA and NANI pigs suggests that it is not a major cause of these transport losses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)511-514
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of animal science
Volume86
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2008

Keywords

  • Dead
  • HAL-1843 mutation
  • Nonambulatory
  • Pig
  • Transport loss

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Genetics

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