Frequency of secondary symbiont infection in an invasive psyllid relates to parasitism pressure on a geographic scale in California

A. K. Hansen, G. Jeong, T. D. Paine, R. Stouthamer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Two endosymbionts, an obligate primary symbiont and a facultative secondary symbiont, are harbored within the invasive red gum (eucalyptus) lerp psyllid, Glycaspis brimblecombei, in California. An extensive survey of diversity and frequency of G. brimblecombei's secondary symbiont in multiple populations throughout the state of California was conducted using PCR detection, restriction enzymes, cloning, and sequencing. A total of 380 G. brimblecombei individuals in 19 populations were screened for secondary symbionts. Based on molecular screening results, only one type of secondary symbiont was present in G. brimblecombei populations in California. Overall, 40% of the 380 psyllids screened were infected with the secondary symbiont. Interestingly, secondary symbiont infection frequencies in G. brimblecombei populations varied dramatically from 0 to 75% and were significantly related to parasitism pressure by Psyllaphaegus bliteus, a solitary endoparasitoid of the psyllid.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)7531-7535
Number of pages5
JournalApplied and environmental microbiology
Volume73
Issue number23
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2007

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Food Science
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
  • Ecology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Frequency of secondary symbiont infection in an invasive psyllid relates to parasitism pressure on a geographic scale in California'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this