Framing Urban Systems and Planning Concerns as a Multilevel Problem: A Review of the Integrated Urban System Models with an Emphasis on Their Hierarchical Structures

Jae Hong Kim, Geoffrey J.D. Hewings

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Metropolitan economies have been pounded by enormous structural changes in the last three decades. This structural change has manifested itself in a different spatial organization of production within metropolitan areas. This article examines how such complex interactions are described in the integrated planning support models to simulate regional as well as subregional growth dynamics. It focuses on the way in which vertical integration is handled. It begins with a review of the integrated framework. The review suggests that strict top-down integration is a dominant approach, although there are various strategies to model the overall dynamics of the macroeconomic changes and the evolution of spatial structure, respectively. Finally, it introduces some alternative ways of modeling vertical integration that try to overcome the critical limitations of the strict, top-down approach and to go beyond the earlier characterization of a top-down/bottom-up dichotomy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe Oxford Handbook of Urban Economics and Planning
PublisherOxford University Press
ISBN (Electronic)9780199940738
ISBN (Print)9780195380620
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 18 2012

Keywords

  • Growth dynamics
  • Integrated planning
  • Metropolitan economies
  • Spatial organization
  • Top-down integration
  • Vertical integration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance(all)

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