Framing challenges of dementia and mental health care in Mexican-origin older adults in Mexico and the United States: Consensus agenda findings and recommendations

Stephanie M. Grasso, Flavia Andrade, Mariana López Ortega, Emma Aguila

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

As older populations around the world continue to increase, so does the number of individuals living with dementia (Prince et al., 2008; Prince, Ali, et al., 2016). Growth in older populations, and hence in likely numbers of persons living with dementia, is particularly rapid for persons of Mexican origin on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border. In Mexico, the population 60 years and older is projected to increase from 8.9% to 21.5% of the total population between the years 2010 and 2050 (CONAPO, 2012). In the United States, Hispanics are the fastest-growing group among older adults (CDC, 2020), and are expected to increase from 7.1% to 19.8% of the U.S. population 65 or older between 2010 and 2050 (Vincent & Velkoff, 2010). U.S. Hispanics are a diverse population with subgroups defined by nativity, country of origin, and time spent in the United States (Andrade & Viruell-Fuentes, 2011). Among U.S. Hispanics, individuals of Mexican descent comprise a majority, accounting for more than 60% of the total U.S. Hispanic population (Markides et al., 1997; Garcia et al., 2018).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationUnderstanding the Context of Cognitive Aging
Subtitle of host publicationMexico and the United States
PublisherSpringer
Pages325-333
Number of pages9
ISBN (Electronic)9783030701192
ISBN (Print)9783030701185
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 3 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)
  • Medicine(all)

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