Formation of graphene oxide nanocomposites from carbon dioxide using ammonia borane

Junshe Zhang, Yu Zhao, Xudong Guan, Ruth E. Stark, Daniel L. Akins, Jae W. Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

To efficiently recycle CO 2 to economically viable products such as liquid fuels and carbon nanomaterials, the reactivity of CO 2 is required to be fully understood. We have investigated the reaction of CO 2 with ammonia borane (AB), both molecules being able to function as either an acid or a base, to obtain more insight into the amphoteric activity of CO 2. In the present work, we demonstrate that CO 2 can be converted to graphene oxide (GO) using AB at moderate conditions. The conversion consists of two consecutive steps: CO 2 fixation (CO 2 pressure <3 MPa and temperature <100 °C) and graphenization (600-750 °C under 0.1 MPa of N 2). The first step generates a solid compound that contains methoxy (OCH 3), formate (HCOO), and aliphatic groups, while the second graphenization is the pyrolysis of the solid compound to produce graphene oxide-boron oxide nanocomposites, which have been confirmed by micro-Raman spectroscopy, solid-state 13C and 11B magic angle spinning-nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Our observations also show that the mass of solid product in CO 2 fixation process and raw graphene oxide nanocomposites is twice and 1.2 times that of AB initially charged, respectively. The formation of aliphatic groups without using metal-containing compounds at mild conditions is of great interest to the synthesis of various organic products starting from CO 2.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2639-2644
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Physical Chemistry C
Volume116
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 26 2012
Externally publishedYes

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Boranes
boranes
Graphite
Carbon Monoxide
Ammonia
Carbon Dioxide
Oxides
Graphene
carbon dioxide
ammonia
Nanocomposites
Carbon dioxide
nanocomposites
graphene
oxides
products
boron oxides
liquid fuels
metal compounds
formates

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Energy(all)
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films

Cite this

Formation of graphene oxide nanocomposites from carbon dioxide using ammonia borane. / Zhang, Junshe; Zhao, Yu; Guan, Xudong; Stark, Ruth E.; Akins, Daniel L.; Lee, Jae W.

In: Journal of Physical Chemistry C, Vol. 116, No. 3, 26.01.2012, p. 2639-2644.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zhang, Junshe ; Zhao, Yu ; Guan, Xudong ; Stark, Ruth E. ; Akins, Daniel L. ; Lee, Jae W. / Formation of graphene oxide nanocomposites from carbon dioxide using ammonia borane. In: Journal of Physical Chemistry C. 2012 ; Vol. 116, No. 3. pp. 2639-2644.
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