Force response and actin remodeling (agglomeration) in fibroblasts due to lateral indentation

Shengyuan Yang, M Taher A Saif

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We report the loading and unloading force response of single living adherent fibroblasts due to large lateral indentation obtained by a two-component microelectromechanical systems force sensor. Strong hysteretic force response is observed for all the tested cells. For the loading process, the force response is linear (often with small initial non-linearity) to a deformation scale comparable to the undeformed cell size, followed by plastic yielding. In situ visualization of actin fibers by tagging with green fluorescent protein indicates that during the indentation process, actin network possibly decomposes irreversibly at discrete locations where well-defined circular actin agglomerates appear all over the cell, which explains the irreversibility of the force response. Similar agglomeration is observed when the cell is compressed laterally by a micro plate. The distribution pattern of the agglomerates strongly correlates with the arrangement of the actin fibers of the pre-indented cell. The size of the agglomerates increases with time as tα, initially with α = 2-3 followed by α = 0.5-1. The higher growth rate suggests influx of actin into the agglomerates. The slower rate suggests a diffusive spreading, but the diffusion constant is two orders of magnitude lower than that of an actin monomer through the cytoplasm. Actin agglomeration has previously been observed due to biochemical treatment, gamma-radiation, and ischemic injury, and has been identified as a precursor to cell death. We believe this is the first evidence of actin agglomeration due to mechanical indentation/compression. The study demonstrates that living cells may initiate similar functionalities in response to dissimilar mechanical and biochemical stimuli.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)77-87
Number of pages11
JournalActa Biomaterialia
Volume3
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2007

Fingerprint

Fibroblasts
Indentation
Actins
Agglomeration
Fibers
Cell death
Unloading
Gamma rays
MEMS
Compaction
Visualization
Monomers
Cells
Plastics
Proteins
Sensors
Radiation Injuries
Gamma Rays
Green Fluorescent Proteins
Cell Size

Keywords

  • Actin fibers
  • Cell mechanics
  • Green fluorescent protein (GFP)
  • Large deformation
  • Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Biomaterials
  • Biochemistry
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Force response and actin remodeling (agglomeration) in fibroblasts due to lateral indentation. / Yang, Shengyuan; Saif, M Taher A.

In: Acta Biomaterialia, Vol. 3, No. 1, 01.01.2007, p. 77-87.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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