Flight mechanics of a tail-less articulated wing aircraft

Aditya A. Paranjape, Soon Jo Chung

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

This paper explores the flight mechanics of a Micro Aerial Vehicle (MAV) without a vertical tail. The key to stability and control of such an aircraft lies in the ability to control the twist and dihedral angles of both wings independently. Specifically, asymmetric dihedral can be used to control yaw whereas antisymmetric twist can be used to control roll. It has been demonstrated that wing dihedral angles can regulate sideslip and speed during a turn maneuver. The role of wing dihedral in the aircraft's longitudinal performance has been explored. It has been shown that dihedral angle can be varied symmetrically to achieve limited control over aircraft speed even as the angle of attack and flight path angle are varied. A rapid descent and perching maneuver has been used to illustrate the longitudinal agility of the aircraft. This paper lays part of the foundation for the design and stability analysis of an agile flapping wing aircraft capable of performing rapid maneuvers while gliding in a constrained environment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAIAA Atmospheric Flight Mechanics Conference 2010
StatePublished - Dec 1 2010
EventAIAA Atmospheric Flight Mechanics Conference 2010 - Toronto, ON, Canada
Duration: Aug 2 2010Aug 5 2010

Publication series

NameAIAA Atmospheric Flight Mechanics Conference 2010

Other

OtherAIAA Atmospheric Flight Mechanics Conference 2010
CountryCanada
CityToronto, ON
Period8/2/108/5/10

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aerospace Engineering
  • Energy(all)

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  • Cite this

    Paranjape, A. A., & Chung, S. J. (2010). Flight mechanics of a tail-less articulated wing aircraft. In AIAA Atmospheric Flight Mechanics Conference 2010 (AIAA Atmospheric Flight Mechanics Conference 2010).