First report and genomic characterization of a bovine‐like coronavirus causing enteric infection in an odd‐toed non ruminant species (Indonesian tapir, Acrocodia indica) during an outbreak of winter dysentery in a zoo

Christian Savard, Chantale Provost, Olivier Ariel, Samuel Morin, Richard Fredrickson, Carl A. Gagnon, André Broes, Leyi Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Bovine Coronavirus (BCoV) is associated with three distinct clinical syndromes in cattle i.e. neonatal diarrhea, hemorrhagic diarrhea in adults (the so-called winter dysentery syndrome, WD) and respiratory infections in cattle of different ages. In addition, bovine-like CoVs have been detected in various species including domestic and wild ruminants. However, bovine-like CoVs have not been reported so far in odd-toed ungulates. We describe an outbreak of WD associated with a bovine-like CoV affecting several captive wild ungulates, including Indonesian tapirs (Acrocodia indica) an odd-toed ungulate species (Perissodactyla) which, with even-toed ungulates species (Artiodactyla) form the clade Euungulata (Graur et al, 14). Genomic characterization of the CoV revealed that it was closely related to BCoVs previously reported in America. This case illustrates the adaptability of bovine-like CoVs to new species and the necessity of continued surveillance of bovine-like CoVs in various species.
Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalTransboundary and Emerging Diseases
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Aug 24 2021

Keywords

  • bovine-like CoV
  • diarrhoea
  • genomic characterization
  • tapir

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

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