First documentation of a volatile sex pheromone in a longhorned beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambyicidae) of the primitive subfamily Prioninae

Daniel E. Cervantes, Lawrence M. Hanks, Emerson S. Lacey, James D. Barbour

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We conducted laboratory and field studies to test the hypothesis that volatile pheromones mediate mate location in the longhorned beetle Prionus californicus Motschulsky (Coleoptera: Cerambyicidae), an important pest of many agricultural and ornamental plants. Males were strongly attracted to live females and to carcasses of freshly killed females in olfactometer bioassays. Males also responded strongly to excised ovipositors of freshly killed females but not to their excised heads, thoraces, or abdomens. In field studies, males were strongly attracted to cages baited with live females. These findings demonstrate that female P. californicus produce a volatile pheromone from the ovipositor that attracts males over a distance, and they provide the first conclusive evidence of a volatile sex pheromone for a species of the primitive cerambycid subfamily Prioninae.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)718-722
Number of pages5
JournalAnnals of the Entomological Society of America
Volume99
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 15 2006

Keywords

  • Mate location
  • Prionus californicus
  • Semiochemical
  • Wood borer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Insect Science

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