Fine-root respiration in a loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) forest exposed to elevated CO2 and N fertilization

John E. Drake, Paul C. Stoy, Robert B. Jackson, Evan H. DeLucia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Forest ecosystems release large amounts of carbon to the atmosphere from fine-root respiration (Rr), but the control of this flux and its temperature sensitivity (Q10) are poorly understood. We attempted to: (1) identify the factors limiting this flux using additions of glucose and an electron transport uncoupler (carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone); and (2) improve yearly estimates of Rr by directly measuring its Q 10in situ using temperature-controlled cuvettes buried around intact, attached roots. The proximal limits of Rr of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) trees exposed to free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) and N fertilization were seasonally variable; enzyme capacity limited Rr in the winter, and a combination of substrate supply and adenylate availability limited Rr in summer months. The limiting factors of Rr were not affected by elevated CO2 or N fertilization. Elevated CO2 increased annual stand-level Rr by 34% whereas the combination of elevated CO2 and N fertilization reduced Rr by 40%. Measurements of in situ Rr with high temporal resolution detected diel patterns that were correlated with canopy photosynthesis with a lag of 1 d or less as measured by eddy covariance, indicating a dynamic link between canopy photosynthesis and root respiration. These results suggest that Rr is coupled to daily canopy photosynthesis and increases with carbon allocation below ground.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1663-1672
Number of pages10
JournalPlant, Cell and Environment
Volume31
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2008

Fingerprint

Pinus taeda
Fertilization
Respiration
carbon dioxide
Photosynthesis
photosynthesis
canopy
Forests
fine roots
Carbon
Temperature
carbon
eddy covariance
cyanides
Electron Transport
Atmosphere
forest ecosystems
electron transfer
Ecosystem

Keywords

  • Carbon cycle
  • Duke FACE
  • FACTS-1
  • Global climate change
  • Net ecosystem exchange
  • Soil respiration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Plant Science

Cite this

Fine-root respiration in a loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) forest exposed to elevated CO2 and N fertilization. / Drake, John E.; Stoy, Paul C.; Jackson, Robert B.; DeLucia, Evan H.

In: Plant, Cell and Environment, Vol. 31, No. 11, 01.11.2008, p. 1663-1672.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{b7965eacb02e4aaaafe52cfddf1878fc,
title = "Fine-root respiration in a loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) forest exposed to elevated CO2 and N fertilization",
abstract = "Forest ecosystems release large amounts of carbon to the atmosphere from fine-root respiration (Rr), but the control of this flux and its temperature sensitivity (Q10) are poorly understood. We attempted to: (1) identify the factors limiting this flux using additions of glucose and an electron transport uncoupler (carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone); and (2) improve yearly estimates of Rr by directly measuring its Q 10in situ using temperature-controlled cuvettes buried around intact, attached roots. The proximal limits of Rr of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) trees exposed to free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) and N fertilization were seasonally variable; enzyme capacity limited Rr in the winter, and a combination of substrate supply and adenylate availability limited Rr in summer months. The limiting factors of Rr were not affected by elevated CO2 or N fertilization. Elevated CO2 increased annual stand-level Rr by 34{\%} whereas the combination of elevated CO2 and N fertilization reduced Rr by 40{\%}. Measurements of in situ Rr with high temporal resolution detected diel patterns that were correlated with canopy photosynthesis with a lag of 1 d or less as measured by eddy covariance, indicating a dynamic link between canopy photosynthesis and root respiration. These results suggest that Rr is coupled to daily canopy photosynthesis and increases with carbon allocation below ground.",
keywords = "Carbon cycle, Duke FACE, FACTS-1, Global climate change, Net ecosystem exchange, Soil respiration",
author = "Drake, {John E.} and Stoy, {Paul C.} and Jackson, {Robert B.} and DeLucia, {Evan H.}",
year = "2008",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/j.1365-3040.2008.01869.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "31",
pages = "1663--1672",
journal = "Plant, Cell and Environment",
issn = "0140-7791",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Fine-root respiration in a loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) forest exposed to elevated CO2 and N fertilization

AU - Drake, John E.

AU - Stoy, Paul C.

AU - Jackson, Robert B.

AU - DeLucia, Evan H.

PY - 2008/11/1

Y1 - 2008/11/1

N2 - Forest ecosystems release large amounts of carbon to the atmosphere from fine-root respiration (Rr), but the control of this flux and its temperature sensitivity (Q10) are poorly understood. We attempted to: (1) identify the factors limiting this flux using additions of glucose and an electron transport uncoupler (carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone); and (2) improve yearly estimates of Rr by directly measuring its Q 10in situ using temperature-controlled cuvettes buried around intact, attached roots. The proximal limits of Rr of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) trees exposed to free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) and N fertilization were seasonally variable; enzyme capacity limited Rr in the winter, and a combination of substrate supply and adenylate availability limited Rr in summer months. The limiting factors of Rr were not affected by elevated CO2 or N fertilization. Elevated CO2 increased annual stand-level Rr by 34% whereas the combination of elevated CO2 and N fertilization reduced Rr by 40%. Measurements of in situ Rr with high temporal resolution detected diel patterns that were correlated with canopy photosynthesis with a lag of 1 d or less as measured by eddy covariance, indicating a dynamic link between canopy photosynthesis and root respiration. These results suggest that Rr is coupled to daily canopy photosynthesis and increases with carbon allocation below ground.

AB - Forest ecosystems release large amounts of carbon to the atmosphere from fine-root respiration (Rr), but the control of this flux and its temperature sensitivity (Q10) are poorly understood. We attempted to: (1) identify the factors limiting this flux using additions of glucose and an electron transport uncoupler (carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone); and (2) improve yearly estimates of Rr by directly measuring its Q 10in situ using temperature-controlled cuvettes buried around intact, attached roots. The proximal limits of Rr of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) trees exposed to free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) and N fertilization were seasonally variable; enzyme capacity limited Rr in the winter, and a combination of substrate supply and adenylate availability limited Rr in summer months. The limiting factors of Rr were not affected by elevated CO2 or N fertilization. Elevated CO2 increased annual stand-level Rr by 34% whereas the combination of elevated CO2 and N fertilization reduced Rr by 40%. Measurements of in situ Rr with high temporal resolution detected diel patterns that were correlated with canopy photosynthesis with a lag of 1 d or less as measured by eddy covariance, indicating a dynamic link between canopy photosynthesis and root respiration. These results suggest that Rr is coupled to daily canopy photosynthesis and increases with carbon allocation below ground.

KW - Carbon cycle

KW - Duke FACE

KW - FACTS-1

KW - Global climate change

KW - Net ecosystem exchange

KW - Soil respiration

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=53449098662&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=53449098662&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1365-3040.2008.01869.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1365-3040.2008.01869.x

M3 - Article

C2 - 18684240

AN - SCOPUS:53449098662

VL - 31

SP - 1663

EP - 1672

JO - Plant, Cell and Environment

JF - Plant, Cell and Environment

SN - 0140-7791

IS - 11

ER -