Field Emission Measurements of Solid Fuel Stoves in Yunnan, China Demonstrate Dominant Causes of Uncertainty in Household Emission Inventories

Ryan J. Thompson, Jihua Li, Cheryl L. Weyant, Rufus Edwards, Qing Lan, Nathaniel Rothman, Wei Hu, Jin Dang, Andy Dang, Kirk R. Smith, Tami C Bond

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Emission factors of carbon monoxide (CO), particulate matter (PM 2.5 ), organic carbon (OC), and elemental carbon (EC), as well as combustion efficiency and particle optical properties were measured during 37 uncontrolled cooking tests of residential stoves in Yunnan Province, China. Fuel mixtures included coal, woody biomass, and agricultural waste. Compared to previously published emission measurements of similar stoves, these measurements have higher CO and PM 2.5 emission factors. Real-time data show two distinct burn phases: a devolatilization phase after fuel addition with high PM 2.5 emissions and a solid-fuel combustion phase with low PM 2.5 emissions. The average emission factors depend on the relative contributions of these phases, which are affected by the services provided by the stoves. Differences in stove and fuel characteristics that are not represented in emission inventories affect the variability of emission factors much more than do the type of solid fuel or stove. In developing inventories with highly variable sources such as residential solid-fuel combustion, we suggest that (1) all fuels should be accounted for, not just the primary fuel; (2) the household service provided should be emphasized rather than specific combinations of solid fuels and devices; and (3) the devolatilization phase should be explicitly measured and represented.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3323-3330
Number of pages8
JournalEnvironmental Science and Technology
Volume53
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 19 2019

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Stoves
emission inventory
Field emission
combustion
Carbon Monoxide
carbon monoxide
Uncertainty
household
stove
Agricultural wastes
Particulate Matter
Coal
Cooking
Organic carbon
optical property
particulate matter
Biomass
Carbon
Optical properties
organic carbon

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry

Cite this

Field Emission Measurements of Solid Fuel Stoves in Yunnan, China Demonstrate Dominant Causes of Uncertainty in Household Emission Inventories. / Thompson, Ryan J.; Li, Jihua; Weyant, Cheryl L.; Edwards, Rufus; Lan, Qing; Rothman, Nathaniel; Hu, Wei; Dang, Jin; Dang, Andy; Smith, Kirk R.; Bond, Tami C.

In: Environmental Science and Technology, Vol. 53, No. 6, 19.03.2019, p. 3323-3330.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Thompson, Ryan J. ; Li, Jihua ; Weyant, Cheryl L. ; Edwards, Rufus ; Lan, Qing ; Rothman, Nathaniel ; Hu, Wei ; Dang, Jin ; Dang, Andy ; Smith, Kirk R. ; Bond, Tami C. / Field Emission Measurements of Solid Fuel Stoves in Yunnan, China Demonstrate Dominant Causes of Uncertainty in Household Emission Inventories. In: Environmental Science and Technology. 2019 ; Vol. 53, No. 6. pp. 3323-3330.
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