Feedback support for training: Accounting for learner and task

Anne Collins McLaughlin, Wendy A. Rogers, Arthur D. Fisk

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Years of research on feedback has not produced universal prescriptions for feedback during training. Results are split in two directions; those recommending more feedback during training and those recommending less. This has resulted in no unified theory and little understanding of other factors that might affect feedback mechanisms. The current experiment manipulated the cognitive load of the task and measured the working memory capacities of the learners to see whether forcing the learner to self-evaluate affects learning of a cognitive task and how this might be moderated by learner ability and task load. Results generally showed that reducing task load through supportive feedback resulted in more learning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication52nd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2008
PublisherHuman Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc.
Pages2057-2061
Number of pages5
ISBN (Print)9781605606859
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008
Externally publishedYes
Event52nd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2008 - New York, NY, United States
Duration: Sep 22 2008Sep 26 2008

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Volume3
ISSN (Print)1071-1813

Other

Other52nd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2008
CountryUnited States
CityNew York, NY
Period9/22/089/26/08

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

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