Fate and transport of chemicals of emerging concern (CECs) during an integrated livestock manure management system for swine wastewater treatment and bioenergy production

Young Hwan Shin, Lance Schideman, Peng Zhang, John W. Scott, Michael Plewa, Yuanhui Zhang

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

A mixed algal-bacterial bioreactor (MABB) was operated with the addition of granular activated carbon (GAC) to extract CECs and other organics from the liquid portion of animal manure (LPAM) and the resulting biomass was harvested for biofuels. Hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) and catalytic hydrothermal gasification (CHG) were performed to study the effects on the fate of the bioactive CECs. GC/MS was used to measure the concentrations of estrone (E1), 17β-estradiol (E2), estriol (E3), and 17α-estradiol (EE2). The research showed that the algal treatment and thermochemical processes can simultaneously remove the CECs 35 up to 96.5% and 99.96% in total estrogenic hormones and convert them into valuable bioenergy products. sCOD, TN, TP, NH3-N in the effluents from bioreactors were investigated to extract the bioactive CECs and the percent removal of each parameters were 74.6, 30.1, 39.5, and 97.0 %, respectively. Mammalian cell cytotoxicity assays were analyzed for the inputs and outputs of the integrated system. GAC was synergistic with MABB to remove the cytotoxicity of LPAM by the adsorption of toxic compounds.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2017 Emerging Contaminants in the Aquatic Environment Conference
StatePublished - 2017

Keywords

  • ISTC

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