False-belief understanding in infants

Renee L Baillargeon, Rose M. Scott, Zijing He

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

At what age can children attribute false beliefs to others? Traditionally, investigations into this question have used elicited-response tasks in which children are asked a direct question about an agent's false belief. Results from these tasks indicate that the ability to attribute false beliefs does not emerge until about age 4. However, recent investigations using spontaneous-response tasks suggest that this ability is present much earlier. Here we review results from various spontaneous-response tasks that suggest that infants in the second year of life can already attribute false beliefs about location and identity as well as false perceptions. We also consider alternative interpretations that have been offered for these results, and discuss why elicited-response tasks are particularly difficult for young children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)110-118
Number of pages9
JournalTrends in Cognitive Sciences
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

Cite this

False-belief understanding in infants. / Baillargeon, Renee L; Scott, Rose M.; He, Zijing.

In: Trends in Cognitive Sciences, Vol. 14, No. 3, 01.03.2010, p. 110-118.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Baillargeon, Renee L ; Scott, Rose M. ; He, Zijing. / False-belief understanding in infants. In: Trends in Cognitive Sciences. 2010 ; Vol. 14, No. 3. pp. 110-118.
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