Failure or Flexibility?

Apprenticeship Training in Premodern Europe

Ruben Schalk, Patrick Wallis, Clare H Crowston, Claire Lemercier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Pre-industrial apprenticeship is often considered more stable than its nineteenth- and twentieth-century counterparts, apparently because of the more durable relationships between masters and apprentices. Nevertheless, recent studies have suggested that many of those who started apprenticeships did not finish them. New evidence about more than 7,000 contracts across several cities in three countries finds that, for a number of reasons, a substantial minority of youths entering apprenticeship contracts failed to complete them. By allowing premature exits, cities and guilds sustained labor markets by lowering the risks of entering long training contracts. Training flexibility was a pragmatic response to labor-market tensions.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)131-158
Number of pages28
JournalJournal of Interdisciplinary History
Volume48
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

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Apprenticeship
Premodern
Labour Market
Guilds
Apprentice
Exit
Minorities

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • History
  • History and Philosophy of Science

Cite this

Failure or Flexibility? Apprenticeship Training in Premodern Europe. / Schalk, Ruben; Wallis, Patrick; Crowston, Clare H; Lemercier, Claire.

In: Journal of Interdisciplinary History, Vol. 48, No. 2, 01.08.2017, p. 131-158.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schalk, Ruben ; Wallis, Patrick ; Crowston, Clare H ; Lemercier, Claire. / Failure or Flexibility? Apprenticeship Training in Premodern Europe. In: Journal of Interdisciplinary History. 2017 ; Vol. 48, No. 2. pp. 131-158.
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