Factors Influencing Caregivers’ Use of Respite Care Services: Secondary Analysis of the National Study of Caregiving

Babatope Ogunjesa, Xiaotian Gao, Minakshi Raj

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study examines when and why unpaid caregivers use respite services. We conducted a secondary analysis of the 2017 National Study of Caregiving (NSOC) Wave III, a U.S. nationally representative sample comprising 2652 unpaid caregivers. We found that unpaid caregivers reporting financial, physical, and emotional difficulties in caregiving were more likely to use respite care services than those not reporting these challenges. White, non-Hispanic caregivers reporting that they received support from their social networks (families/friends) were more likely to use respite care services than non-White and/or Hispanic caregivers receiving such support. Non-White and/or Hispanic caregivers who belonged to or attended support groups were more likely to use respite care support than those without social group affiliation. Respite care is underutilized in the U.S. despite its value and efficacy in supporting caregivers’ mental and physical well-being. Policies are necessary to increase availability and access to respite services for diverse unpaid caregivers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Applied Gerontology
DOIs
StateE-pub ahead of print - Feb 1 2024

Keywords

  • caregivers
  • mental health
  • respite care
  • wellbeing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gerontology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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