Factors affecting perceptions of human-wildlife interactions in residential areas of northern New York and implications for conservation

Heidi E. Kretser, Paul D. Curtis, Joseph D. Francis, Rolf J. Pendall, Barbara A. Knuth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We explored factors influencing people's perceptions of human-wildlife interactions in residential areas, reporting interactions to authorities, and potential conservation implications. Data were obtained from a mail survey of 1,439 landowners. We used logistic regression to predict probabilities of having non-positive perceptions and reporting interactions to authorities. Our models predicted perceptions relatively well; factors influencing perceptions included attitudes toward wildlife, experiences with wildlife, age, urban or rural upbringing, and location of current residence. Our models did not predict reports of human-wildlife interactions with satisfactory accuracy. Overall perceptions of wildlife interactions were more positive compared to perceptions of experiences with specific species around respondents' homes. Those not having positive interactions demonstrated less support for land and wildlife conservation. Future research should explore species-specific and incident-specific details to anticipate potentially negative perceptions of human-wildlife interactions, develop mechanisms for engaging those indifferent to wildlife interactions, and determine interventions that maintain support for conservation endeavors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)102-118
Number of pages17
JournalHuman Dimensions of Wildlife
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2009
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Adirondack park
  • Exurban
  • Human-wildlife conflict
  • Logistic regression
  • Protected area
  • Urban-rural interface

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nature and Landscape Conservation
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

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