Fabian Society

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingEntry for encyclopedia/dictionary

Abstract

The Fabian Society, a socialist discussion group, was founded in 1884. The Fabians rejected violent revolution in favor of more gradualist tactics: they published hundreds of pamphlets on policy questions, sponsored public lectures on socialist topics, founded the London School of Economics, and tried to push Liberal and Labour politicians toward more socialist policies. Their position as middle‐class technocrats attracted many creative writers and other intellectuals, including George Bernard Shaw and H. G. Wells. The Fabian Society is still active today as a think tank for the Labour Party.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe Encyclopedia of Victorian Literature
EditorsDino Franco Felluga
PublisherWiley-Blackwell
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

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Keywords

  • revolution and social change
  • science fiction
  • socialism
  • theater

Cite this

Courtemanche, E. (2015). Fabian Society. In D. F. Felluga (Ed.), The Encyclopedia of Victorian Literature Wiley-Blackwell. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781118405376.wbevl113