Extrusion Conditions Affect Chemical Composition and in Vitro Digestion of Select Food Ingredients

Jolene M. Dust, Angela M. Gama, Elizabeth A. Flickinger, Toni M. Burkhalter, Neal R. Merchen, George C. Fahey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

An experiment was conducted to determine the effects of extrusion conditions on chemical composition and in vitro hydrolytic and fermentative digestion of barley grits, cornmeal, oat bran, soybean flour, soybean hulls, and wheat bran. Extrusion conditions altered crude protein, fiber, and starch concentrations of ingredients. Organic matter disappearance (OMD) increased for extruded versus unprocessed samples of barley grits, cornmeal, and soybean flour that had been hydrolytically digested. After 8 h of fermentative digestion, OMD decreased as extrusion conditions intensified for barley grits and cornmeal but increased for oat bran, soybean hulls, and wheat bran. Total short-chain fatty acid production decreased as extrusion conditions intensified for barley grits, soybean hulls, and soybean flour. These data suggest that the effects of extrusion conditions on ingredient composition and digestion are influenced by the unique chemical characteristics of individual substrates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2989-2996
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Volume52
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - May 19 2004

Keywords

  • Chemical composition
  • Digestion
  • Extrusion
  • In vitro
  • Short-chain fatty acids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

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