Extinction of near-bed turbulence due to self-stratification in turbidity currents: The dependence on shear reynolds number

Mariano I. Cantero, S. Balachandar, A. Cantelli, Gary Parker

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Turbidity currents are dense bottom flows driven by suspended sediment that occur in lakes and the ocean. Turbidity currents are self-stratifying in that the agent of the density difference, i.e., sediment, must be maintained in suspension if the flow is to be sustained. It has recently been shown using Direct Numerical Simulation that under appropriate conditions, the upward normal profile of suspended sediment may show a gradient sufficient to cause the extinction of turbulence near the bed. This extinction creates conditions favorable to the emplacement of massive turbidites, i.e., sediment deposits which show no evidence of reworking by the flow. The results were established using a shear Reynolds number of 180. Here the question of Reynolds invariance is studied by repeating the calculations with a shear Reynolds number of 400.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationEnvironmental Fluid Mechanics
Subtitle of host publicationMemorial Volume in Honour of Prof. Gerhard H. Jirka
PublisherCRC Press
Pages347-354
Number of pages8
ISBN (Electronic)9780203803967
ISBN (Print)9780415670456
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

Fingerprint

Suspended sediments
turbidity current
Turbidity
Reynolds number
Sediments
stratification
Turbulence
turbulence
extinction
suspended sediment
Direct numerical simulation
Invariance
Lakes
Deposits
reworking
sediment
emplacement
lake
ocean
simulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Cantero, M. I., Balachandar, S., Cantelli, A., & Parker, G. (2012). Extinction of near-bed turbulence due to self-stratification in turbidity currents: The dependence on shear reynolds number. In Environmental Fluid Mechanics: Memorial Volume in Honour of Prof. Gerhard H. Jirka (pp. 347-354). CRC Press. https://doi.org/10.1201/b12283

Extinction of near-bed turbulence due to self-stratification in turbidity currents : The dependence on shear reynolds number. / Cantero, Mariano I.; Balachandar, S.; Cantelli, A.; Parker, Gary.

Environmental Fluid Mechanics: Memorial Volume in Honour of Prof. Gerhard H. Jirka. CRC Press, 2012. p. 347-354.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Cantero, MI, Balachandar, S, Cantelli, A & Parker, G 2012, Extinction of near-bed turbulence due to self-stratification in turbidity currents: The dependence on shear reynolds number. in Environmental Fluid Mechanics: Memorial Volume in Honour of Prof. Gerhard H. Jirka. CRC Press, pp. 347-354. https://doi.org/10.1201/b12283
Cantero MI, Balachandar S, Cantelli A, Parker G. Extinction of near-bed turbulence due to self-stratification in turbidity currents: The dependence on shear reynolds number. In Environmental Fluid Mechanics: Memorial Volume in Honour of Prof. Gerhard H. Jirka. CRC Press. 2012. p. 347-354 https://doi.org/10.1201/b12283
Cantero, Mariano I. ; Balachandar, S. ; Cantelli, A. ; Parker, Gary. / Extinction of near-bed turbulence due to self-stratification in turbidity currents : The dependence on shear reynolds number. Environmental Fluid Mechanics: Memorial Volume in Honour of Prof. Gerhard H. Jirka. CRC Press, 2012. pp. 347-354
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