Extending yield-stress fluid paradigms

Arif Z. Nelson, Rafael E. Bras, Jingping Liu, Randy H Ewoldt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We report experimental measurements of high extensibility of several yield-stress fluids, demonstrating a behavior completely outside the standard paradigm of model materials and constitutive equations for yield-stress fluids. We identify "highly" extensible materials using uniaxial tension tests, as materials with values of strain-to-break larger than predictions from the tensorial Herschel-Bulkley model, and larger strain-to-break than some of the most studied model materials including aqueous microgel particle suspensions (Carbopol), and aqueous clay suspensions (Laponite and Bentonite). Materials in commercial use, including a printing resin, chewing gums, and food products, have a yield stress but do not rupture until reaching extremely large extensional deformations. The purpose of this work is to introduce a method for characterizing the extensibility of yield-stress fluids, demonstrate the range of extensibility seen in real yield-stress fluids (commercial products, biomaterials), and introduce one possible model material for highly extensible yield-stress fluids: Silicone oil droplets emulsified at moderate volume fraction into an aqueous solution of polyvinyl alcohol cross-linked by sodium tetraborate.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)357-369
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Rheology
Volume62
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Yield stress
Fluids
fluids
Suspensions
mastication
Mastication
Bentonite
Silicone Oils
Polyvinyl Alcohol
Sodium borate
bentonite
polyvinyl alcohol
Polyvinyl alcohols
constitutive equations
Biocompatible Materials
silicones
products
Constitutive equations
food
Biomaterials

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

Extending yield-stress fluid paradigms. / Nelson, Arif Z.; Bras, Rafael E.; Liu, Jingping; Ewoldt, Randy H.

In: Journal of Rheology, Vol. 62, No. 1, 01.01.2018, p. 357-369.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nelson, AZ, Bras, RE, Liu, J & Ewoldt, RH 2018, 'Extending yield-stress fluid paradigms', Journal of Rheology, vol. 62, no. 1, pp. 357-369. https://doi.org/10.1122/1.5003841
Nelson, Arif Z. ; Bras, Rafael E. ; Liu, Jingping ; Ewoldt, Randy H. / Extending yield-stress fluid paradigms. In: Journal of Rheology. 2018 ; Vol. 62, No. 1. pp. 357-369.
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