Expression of inflammatory cytokines and Toll-like receptors in the brain and respiratory tract of pigs infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

J. C. Miguel, J. Chen, W. G. Van Alstine, R. W. Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The objective of this experiment was to evaluate the central and peripheral expression of selected pro-inflammatory cytokines and Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in pigs infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). Twenty-four 8-week-old pigs were inoculated with either sterile medium or PRRSV. Pigs were monitored 14. d after inoculation and then euthanized for tissue sample collection. PRRSV was detected in serum, lung and brain tissue of pigs given PRRSV but not in any tissue of pigs given medium. Infection with PRRSV increased serum levels of IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα, and IFNγ and elicited a mild transient fever and reduced growth performance. Infection by PRRSV also increased mRNA for the pro-inflammatory cytokines as well as mRNA for TLR3, TLR4, and TLR7 in the tracheobronchial lymph nodes. The TLR3, TLR4, TLR7 and most of the pro-inflammatory genes also were up-regulated in discrete brain areas of PRRSV-infected pigs. Collectively, the results indicate that following inoculation, PRRSV is present in the periphery and brain and that infection is associated with a peripheral and central pro-inflammatory response, fever, and reduced growth performance. The findings are interpreted to suggest the innate immune system of the brain is responsive to PRRSV infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)314-319
Number of pages6
JournalVeterinary Immunology and Immunopathology
Volume135
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2010

Keywords

  • Brain
  • Cytokine
  • PRRSV
  • Respiratory tract
  • Swine
  • Toll-like receptor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • veterinary(all)

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