Explaining perceptions of competitive threat in a multiracial context

Vincent L. Hutchings, James Jackson, Cara Wong, Ronald E. Brown

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The United States has undergone a dramatic demographic transformation in the last several decades. For example, as recently as 1980, the U.S. census reported that White Americans represented over 79 percent of the total national population. Most of the remaining fraction of Americans was of African descent (11 percent). Hispanics and Asian Americans were a much smaller share of the population at 6 percent and 1 percent, respectively. In the ensuing twenty years, however, increased immigration and relatively high birth rates have resulted in a surprisingly rapid growth in the number of Hispanic and Asian Americans and a concomitant decline in the proportion of Whites. According to the most recent census, Whites now represent 69 percent of the national population whereas Hispanics account for almost 13 percent and Asian Americans – the fastest-growing ethnic/racial group in the country – make up almost 4 percent. The share of Blacks in the population has held fairly steady over the past twenty years at 12 percent, although their rate of increase remains much smaller than is the case for Asians and Hispanics. As the racial environment in this country has grown increasingly complex, the old Black-White binary perspective on American race relations is being joined by, and perhaps replaced with, a newer racial dynamic. That is, in addition to the traditional political divide between Whites and African Americans over such hot-button issues as affirmative action and bussing, the nation is increasingly confronted with contentious disputes over the rights of language minorities and immigration issues.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationRace, Reform, and Regulation of the Electoral Process
Subtitle of host publicationRecurring Puzzles in American Democracy
EditorsGuy-Uriel E Charles, Heather K. Gerken, Michael S Kang
PublisherCambridge University Press
Pages52-74
Number of pages23
ISBN (Electronic)9780511976612
ISBN (Print)9781107001671
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

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  • Cite this

    Hutchings, V. L., Jackson, J., Wong, C., & Brown, R. E. (2011). Explaining perceptions of competitive threat in a multiracial context. In G-U. E. Charles, H. K. Gerken, & M. S. Kang (Eds.), Race, Reform, and Regulation of the Electoral Process: Recurring Puzzles in American Democracy (pp. 52-74). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511976612.006