Explaining global patterns of international aid for linked biodiversity conservation and development

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

There is little systematic knowledge about the nature, extent, and trends of international aid for projects that link biodiversity conservation and development goals. This study uses a new dataset to analyze spatial and temporal patterns of such aid globally over the past three decades. Results reveal significant donor selectivity in aid allocation, though linked conservation and development aid comprised more than two-thirds of all biodiversity-related assistance. Biodiversity aid generally was directed to biodiversity-rich, well-governed countries, but countries able to exert greater political leverage secured more linked aid than aid targeted to conservation without a stated development objective.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)341-359
Number of pages19
JournalWorld Development
Volume59
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

international aid
biodiversity
aid
conservation
development aid
assistance
Biodiversity conservation
International aid
Biodiversity
trend
Conservation

Keywords

  • Aid allocation
  • Biodiversity conservation
  • Conservation finance
  • Environmental aid
  • Foreign aid
  • Sustainable development

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Development
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

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abstract = "There is little systematic knowledge about the nature, extent, and trends of international aid for projects that link biodiversity conservation and development goals. This study uses a new dataset to analyze spatial and temporal patterns of such aid globally over the past three decades. Results reveal significant donor selectivity in aid allocation, though linked conservation and development aid comprised more than two-thirds of all biodiversity-related assistance. Biodiversity aid generally was directed to biodiversity-rich, well-governed countries, but countries able to exert greater political leverage secured more linked aid than aid targeted to conservation without a stated development objective.",
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