Executive Summary to EDC-2: The Endocrine Society's second Scientific Statement on endocrine-disrupting chemicals

A. C. Gore, V. A. Chappell, S. E. Fenton, J. A. Flaws, A. Nadal, G. S. Prins, J. Toppari, R. T. Zoeller

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

This Executive Summary to the Endocrine Society's second Scientific Statement on environmental endocrinedisrupting chemicals (EDCs) provides a synthesis of the key points of the complete statement. The full Scientific Statement represents a comprehensive review of the literature on seven topics for which there is strong mechanistic, experimental, animal, and epidemiological evidence for endocrine disruption, namely: obesity and diabetes, female reproduction, male reproduction, hormone-sensitive cancers in females, prostate cancer, thyroid, and neurodevelopment and neuroendocrine systems. EDCs such as bisphenol A, phthalates, pesticides, persistent organic pollutants such as polychlorinated biphenyls, polybrominated diethyl ethers, and dioxins were emphasized because these chemicals had the greatest depth and breadth of available information. The Statement also included thorough coverage of studies of developmental exposures to EDCs, especially in the fetus and infant, because these are critical life stages during which perturbations of hormones can increase the probability of a disease or dysfunction later in life. A conclusion of the Statement is that publications over the past 5 years have led to a much fuller understanding of the endocrine principles by which EDCs act, including nonmonotonic dose-responses, low-dose effects, and developmental vulnerability. These findings will prove useful to researchers, physicians, and other healthcare providers in translating the science of endocrine disruption to improved public health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)593-602
Number of pages10
JournalEndocrine reviews
Volume36
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Endocrine Disruptors
Reproduction
Hormones
Neurosecretory Systems
Dioxins
Polychlorinated Biphenyls
Thyroid Neoplasms
Pesticides
Health Personnel
Ether
Publications
Prostatic Neoplasms
Fetus
Public Health
Obesity
Research Personnel
Physicians
Neoplasms
phthalic acid
bisphenol A

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Executive Summary to EDC-2 : The Endocrine Society's second Scientific Statement on endocrine-disrupting chemicals. / Gore, A. C.; Chappell, V. A.; Fenton, S. E.; Flaws, J. A.; Nadal, A.; Prins, G. S.; Toppari, J.; Zoeller, R. T.

In: Endocrine reviews, Vol. 36, No. 6, 01.01.2015, p. 593-602.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Gore, AC, Chappell, VA, Fenton, SE, Flaws, JA, Nadal, A, Prins, GS, Toppari, J & Zoeller, RT 2015, 'Executive Summary to EDC-2: The Endocrine Society's second Scientific Statement on endocrine-disrupting chemicals', Endocrine reviews, vol. 36, no. 6, pp. 593-602. https://doi.org/10.1210/er.2015-1093
Gore, A. C. ; Chappell, V. A. ; Fenton, S. E. ; Flaws, J. A. ; Nadal, A. ; Prins, G. S. ; Toppari, J. ; Zoeller, R. T. / Executive Summary to EDC-2 : The Endocrine Society's second Scientific Statement on endocrine-disrupting chemicals. In: Endocrine reviews. 2015 ; Vol. 36, No. 6. pp. 593-602.
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