Excess porewater pressures during secondary compression

G. Mesri, N. Huvaj, B. Vardhanabhuti, Y. H. Ho

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

A gradient in an excess porewater pressure conveys water out of soil during secondary compression. This excess porewater pressure is produced by the tendency of soil to continue compression as a result of the disequilibrium produced during primary compression. Because the measurement of excess porewater pressure is frequently specified for establishing the progress of primary consolidation, it is useful to know the order of magnitude of excess porewater pressure associated with secondary compression. Mathematical analyses and experimental results suggest magnitudes of excess porewater pressure at the beginning of secondary compression corresponding to u′ m/ σ′ v = 1 to 3 % for C α / C c = 0.03 to 0.07, respectively, which decrease rapidly with the progress of secondary compression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 16th International Conference on Soil Mechanics and Geotechnical Engineering
Subtitle of host publicationGeotechnology in Harmony with the Global Environment
Pages1087-1090
Number of pages4
StatePublished - Dec 1 2005
Event16th International Conference on Soil Mechanics and Geotechnical Engineering: Geotechnology in Harmony with the Global Environment, ICSMGE 2005 - Osaka, Japan
Duration: Sep 12 2005Sep 16 2005

Publication series

NameProceedings of the 16th International Conference on Soil Mechanics and Geotechnical Engineering: Geotechnology in Harmony with the Global Environment
Volume2

Other

Other16th International Conference on Soil Mechanics and Geotechnical Engineering: Geotechnology in Harmony with the Global Environment, ICSMGE 2005
CountryJapan
CityOsaka
Period9/12/059/16/05

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Soil Science
  • Geotechnical Engineering and Engineering Geology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Excess porewater pressures during secondary compression'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this